Research & Publications

Research at CICJ focuses on legal, empirical and theoretical aspects of international crimes and international criminal justice. Building on both legal and criminological research tools, CICJ takes an interdisciplinary approach, focusing on the following three areas of research:

  1. How to map and measure the prevalence of international crimes
  2. How to explain the causes of these crimes
  3. How to tailor effective responses to these crimes

Each of the research projects below focuses on one or more of these aspects.

Angola and Transitional Justice

Breaking the Cycle of Violence in Post-Conflict Settings: The Potential of Community-Based Sociotherapy in Rwanda

Breaking the Chain of Command

Casuistry in International Criminal Law

Citizen digital evidence and international crimes

Corporations and International Crimes

The Crime of Aggression: Consequences of Applying International Criminal Law to a Radically Indeterminate Concept

Criminal Careers of Dutch War Criminals

Escaping Justice

Eyewitness Memory in Cross-Cultural Contexts

Human Evil

In Limbo

Insider witnesses’ credibility and reliability: an empirical legal framework for international criminal justice

Insider witnesses’ credibility and reliability: an empirical legal framework for international criminal justice

Knowing what we know now: international crimes in historical perspective

Modes of Liability and the “Fragmentation” of International Criminal Law

Sanctions under the ICC’s Principle of Complementarity: Case Study of Colombia

Transitional Justice and Counterterrorism Approaches in Iraq’s Post-IS Landscape

Universal Jurisdiction Trials of Core International Crimes and the Applicable Legal Standards

Vertical (In)consistency of International Sentencing: Case Study of Bosnia and Herzegovina and Rwanda

When Justice is Done: Life After Conviction or Acquittal

The Wheel of Restoration

Yugonostalgia in Comparative Perspective